A while back I wrote this article entitled “Fair Means Or Foul”.

I can now reveal that the domain that inspired me to write this was DIY.com.au.

This domain is “dropping today”, and whilst it will no doubt be hotly contested on Domain Shield and Drop, it’s not going to be available to bid on at Netfleet. Whilst the domain features on their homepage as you can see, it is not on their auction page.

Why? Because someone placed a backorder on this domain at Netfleet long ago. I might be wrong, but I believe this person was aware that the eligibility details were incorrect (it’s an old South Australian Business Name Registration as you can see below) – and made a complaint to auDA.

DIY WhoIs 4 Nov 2015

auDA Is Not The Ogre In This

In fact, if anything, they bent over backwards to try and assist the registrant to keep this valuable domain. The domain has been in and out of “Policy Delete” status a few times over the past couple of months. For those not in the know, with a “Policy Delete”, the registrant still has 14 days to resurrect the situation.

auDA was totally within their rights to delete the domain after the first 14 days, but thanks to representations from Anthony Peake at Domain Shield (the registrant was a past client of his), they gave him two further opportunities to rectify (and told him what he had to do). Big hat tip to Anthony for doing this – it’s great when a registrar actually goes over and above to try and help.

But the registrant didn’t do what he had to do, so policy is now going to be followed.

All I can say is that if it was my domain, and my old Business Registration, I would have done anything and everything required to get my “eligibility” sorted out.

My Opinion

As I wrote previously, there is nothing wrong with legitimate backorders where you may know that a domain is going to expire because of other circumstances. I’ve seen some excellent acquisitions made by people who have good intel!

However, I think people who try and score good domains by filing anonymous or confidential complaints (like the above) and doing backorders deserve criticism.

I also believe that it would be in everyone’s interests if Netfleet didn’t allow backorders on “Policy Deleted” names. If a domain does have to be deleted because of policy, put it up for auction. Don’t encourage those that seek to look for other people’s mistakes or misfortune.

In fact, if anyone else is the loser today (apart from the old registrant) it is Netfleet. The best they can get out of today is $200 – and if they don’t “catch it” and it goes for $10k on another platform, then that will surely make them think twice!

What do you think?

 

 

5 thoughts on “DIY.com.au

  • November 4, 2015 at 10:14 am
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    Nice domain. Surprised NF allowed this one to be backordered in the first place, given their restriction policy

    I also believe that it would be in everyone’s interests if Netfleet didn’t allow backorders on “Policy Deleted” names

    This would be great.

    • Ned O'Meara
      November 4, 2015 at 6:22 pm
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      @Richard

      Surprised NF allowed this one to be backordered in the first place, given their restriction policy

      Agreed. I bet you there was some gnashing of teeth as they saw domain reach $14k on Drop. That would have paid for a nice staff Xmas party. 😉

      • Luke Summers
        November 4, 2015 at 7:17 pm
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        Yeah I bet that stung seeing the price on drop.com.au.

        On the flip side, I wouldn’t be surprised if they see an increase in backorder purchases as a result of this catch.

  • November 4, 2015 at 1:31 pm
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    I’ve said it before in previous posts on this site, auDA complaints should not be anonymous.

    This whole industry is shrouded in block-out curtains. Everything should be transparent.

    Perhaps this is why the average business is so sceptical of being offered premium domain names for purchase. They just don’t trust anything to do with domain names or SEO or anything online related.

    • Ned O'Meara
      November 5, 2015 at 8:24 am
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      @Robert – agree with you about auDA complaints. I believe complainants should have to pay a small fee to lodge their complaint (which can even be refunded if the complaint is upheld). If a complainant is genuine, then they shouldn’t have a problem doing this imho.

      However I don’t agree with this statement of yours!

      Perhaps this is why the average business is so sceptical of being offered premium domain names for purchase. They just don’t trust anything to do with domain names or SEO or anything online related.

      I don’t find there to be a lack of trust – particularly if you have a good track record and can explain process logically. Obviously though there can be exceptions to the rule. 😉

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